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First Annual Block Party to Follow Gautier Men’s Club Parade

25289749_1510611925702646_7577422849306949528_n First Annual Block Party to Follow Gautier Men's Club Parade

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There are a lot of new changes coming to the Gautier Men’s Club this Mardi Gras season.

The 2018 parade, now called the Gautier Mardi Gras Night Parade and Block Party, will roll at 7 p.m. on February 3rd. The parade will be taking a different route-beginning and ending at the Dolphin Road Roundabout. The route goes from the roundabout, east on Dolphin Road, then south on Gautier-Vancleave Road. The route then takes a right onto U.S. 90 and then takes a right back onto Dolphin and ends at the roundabout for the block party. The parade theme this year is ‘Get Funky’. 

There will be a pre-party tomorrow night for people who have reserved their spots, but the main block party will happen after the parade on Saturday. The block party will feature live music from 8 to 11:30 p.m. with a high school battle of the bands, including the Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College band.

This will be the first block party for the Gautier Men’s Club and they’re hoping to keep it going each year. The block party is free to attend and will open to the public to celebrate Mardi Gras with the Gautier Men’s Club. 

Since its inception, the Gautier Men’s Club has helped Gautier and surrounding communities by donating time and money it raises throughout the year. Among its annual projects are the sponsorships of families at Thanksgiving and Christmas, including Christmas toys for children. 

The club presents awards to the firefighter and police officer of the year, the Gautier Citizen of the Year and annual scholarships to graduating Jackson County seniors. The club’s annual parade is open to all organizations, with each decorating its float based on its own theme.

 
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2018 Mardi Gras Balls

king-and-queen- 2018 Mardi Gras Balls

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With Mardi Gras parades follows the royalty of each crewe’s Mardi Gras ball. Here are the Mardi Gras balls happening on the Gulf Coast this year: 

Jan. 19 – 7 p.m.

41ST ANNUAL KREWE OF ATHENA BALL

Gruich Community Center, Biloxi – Must have a view card from Athena member to view ball. Invitation only for floor.

Jan 19th- 8 PM

KREWE OF ISIS BALL 

Jackson County Civic Center, Pascagoula

Invitation only

Jan. 20 – 7 p.m.

KREWE OF NEREIDS BALL

Mississippi Coast Coliseum & Convention Center, Biloxi

Invitation only – thekreweofnereids.com

Jan. 20 – 7 p.m.

OCEAN SPRINGS CARNIVAL ASSOCIATION BALL

Tickets: $50 – (228) 297-1990 or (228) 219-2475

Jan. 20 – 7 p.m.

SOUTHERNETTES BALL

Biloxi Civic Center

Open to the public – $50 per person

Jan. 20 – 7:30 p.m.

KREWE OF VENUS BALL

Jackson County Civic Center, Pascagoula

Invitation only

Jan. 26

ORDER OF BILLIKINS BALL

Biloxi Community Center

Invitation only

Jan. 27 – 8 p.m.

49TH ANNUAL KREWE OF GEMINI BALL

Biloxi Civic Center

Invitation only

Feb. 2 – 7 p.m.

CARNIVAL ASSOCIATION OF LONG BEACH ROYAL TABLEAU & BALL

St. Vincent de Paul Catholic School, Long Beach

Open to the public – Tickets: $40

Longbeachcarnival.com

Feb. 2 – 8 p.m.

LES MASQUEES BALL

Gruich Community Center, Biloxi

Feb. 3 – 8 p.m.

KREWE OF NEPTUNE CORONATION BALL

Biloxi Civic Center

Kreweofneptune.org

Tickets sold out

Feb. 3 – 7 p.m.

KREWE OF HARLEQUINS BALL

Mississippi Coast Coliseum & Convention Center, Biloxi

Invitation only

Feb. 3 – 7 p.m.

KREWE OF REAL PEOPLE NEXT GENERATION BALL

Community Center, Bay St. Louis

Open to public

Tickets: $20 per person, $160 table of eight

(228) 671-1039 or (228) 305-0817

Feb. 3 – 6:30 p.m.

KREWE OF DIAMONDHEAD BALL

Diamondhead Country Club

Invitation only

Feb. 3 – 7 p.m.

LES CAVALIERS BALL

IP Resort and Casino, Biloxi

Invitation only

Feb. 9 – 7 p.m.

PAUL’S CARNIVAL ASSOCIATION ROYAL BALL

St. Vincent de Paul School, Long Beach

Tickets: $40

(228) 355-0146

Feb. 9 – 8 p.m.

ORDER OF MITHRAS BALL

Gruich Community Center, Biloxi

Invitation only

Feb. 10 – 7 p.m.

KREWE OF LES BELLE FLUERS BALL

Gruich Community Center, Biloxi

Tickets: $20

Tickets sold ahead of time and remaining tickets sold at the door

Feb. 12 – 8 p.m.

ANNUAL GULF COAST CARNIVAL ASSOCIATION BALL

Mississippi Coast Coliseum & Convention Center, Biloxi

(228) 432-8806

Free admission for viewing; to participate is invitation only

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What’s with the Baby in King Cakes?

kingcakebaby What's with the Baby in King Cakes?

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King Cakes are a traditional dessert loved by all during the Mardi Gras season. They come in a variety of flavors from cheese cake to chocolate and is known for its sweet icing and colorful frosting. But what’s the deal with the plastic baby inside the cake? There are many beliefs as to what the baby actually represents, so JaxCoHome wanted to research the history of the baby and king cake; how it’s relevant to Mardi Gras; and what it means if you get a piece with a plastic baby in the middle. 

King Cakes can actually be found as early as the beginning of the year and at the center of celebrations through early spring. Some associate it with Mardi Gras, others with a celebration known as Epiphany. According to Eater, King cake is eaten on January 6 in honor of Epiphany, or Twelfth Night, which historically marks the arrival of the three wise men/kings in Bethlehem who delivered gifts to the baby Jesus. King cake also appears on tables throughout the Carnival season, which runs from Epiphany to Fat Tuesday (the day before Ash Wednesday and the start of Lent).

Many people call King Cakes different names and it comes in a variety of shapes, sizes and styles. Most people are familiar with with the dough-like consistency twisted into a ring, filled with a wide array of flavors and decorated with colored icing and sprinkles. The glaze is the most popular part of the cake, including the three colors found on top: gold, green and purple. Variants can be made from cake batter or bread dough or pastry, but almost all versions are shaped into a circle or oval to mimic the appearance of a king’s crown. 

Every king cake contains a trinket — often a small figurine in the shape of a baby — which plays a crucial part in the celebration of the holiday that inspired this pastry. There are two theories behind the trinket in the cake. Some believe the plastic baby is symbolism of Baby Jesus because of the religious connection to King’s Day. Others, however, believe the popular New Orleans lore, which suggests that an elaborate cake was served with a bean or ring placed inside during the commemoration of the king’s ball in colonial Louisiana. Whoever found the bean or trinket in his or her slice of cake would be crowned the king or queen of the balls leading up to the lavish finale on Mardi Gras. 

Now, instead of using a bean or a ring the plastic baby is mostly used today as an emblem of good luck. Though as history would have it, the lucky individual who scores the piece of king cake with the baby inside is said to gain favor, and they’re also tasked with hosting duties and bringing their own king cake for next year’s revelry.

So, you’re probably craving one now, right? Well, you’re in luck because there are plenty of bakeries in Jackson County who make these delicious, seasonal treats. Our favorite is Crazy B’s Coffee & Confections located in Pascagoula. Owner of the bakery, Susan, says they sell out of their famous king cake bites every year. “It’s like a mini ball of king cake”, she said. “It makes a great party tray to bring to your Mardi Gras party for everyone to share.” 

For all updates and information for Mardi Gras in Jackson County, visit our Mardi Gras section on our site and Facebook page

 

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