Grants Available for Storefronts in Jackson County

PASCAGOULA, MS—The Jackson County Chamber of Commerce is now accepting applications for the 2018 Façade Grant Program.  Façade Grants are due on April 6, 2018, at 5:00 p.m.  These are available for Chamber member businesses and organizations with under 50 employees.  Examples of façade improvements can include but are not limited to the following: overall cleaning; awnings/canopies; signs; lighting; ornamental elements (i.e. – shutters); painting; general maintenance (i.e. – glass replacement, caulking, etc.); and wall material.  

The grants are $2,500 each.  The fund allows businesses to apply for these grants through corporate contributions from companies that are interested in the growth and development of the business community in Jackson County.  Grants are privately funded.  The Chamber is here to support community and business development throughout Jackson County. 

Companies wishing to apply for upcoming grants from the Chamber must be active members of the Jackson County Chamber of Commerce and already be in business.  Applications for these grants can be found on the Chamber website (www.jcchamber.com).  The deadline to submit the grants electronically is April 6, 2018, at 5:00 p.m.  Award recipients will be announced at the Grand Finale and Business After Hours for the 2018 Community Business-to-Business Membership Drive on April 19th.  This will also be in celebration of Membership Appreciation Day.  

Anyone interested in learning more about the guidelines of this program or joining the Chamber to be able to apply should contact the Jackson County Chamber of Commerce at 228-762-3391 or newsletter@jcchamber.com.  New members who join between February 22nd and April 9th are also eligible to be in a drawing for a $1,250 Small Business Grant (subject to approval) during the 2018 Community Business-to-Business Membership Drive.  New members can also apply for a free outdoor booth at the Jackson County Industrial Trade Show on March 20, 2018.  More information can be found online at www.jcchamber.com

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Marina Cottage Soap Co. Inc.™ in Ocean Springs, MS lands deal with SeaWorld Corporation

seaworld Marina Cottage Soap Co. Inc.™ in Ocean Springs, MS lands deal with SeaWorld Corporation seaworld Marina Cottage Soap Co. Inc.™ in Ocean Springs, MS lands deal with SeaWorld CorporationOcean Springs — Marina Cottage Soap Co. announced that they have landed a deal with SeaWorld Corporation to have their products featured in 7 parks across the USA.

“This is such a dream come true,” said Vanessa Mueller, RN, Owner, of in Ocean Springs, MS, Marina Cottage Soap Co.

Marina Cottage Soap Co. Inc. products can now be found in both SeaWorld and Busch Gardens across the USA.

“The parks are carrying Nourishing Body Crème, Goats Milk Soap, Organic Bubble Bath and Exfoliating Sugar Whipped Soap in 5 different scents” said Mueller.

Talks began last year at Americasmart in Atlanta and the products were trialed in Busch Gardens, Va., over the summer to determine if there was a market for their natural products at the parks. Fast-forward to October 2017 and orders began pouring in from Busch Gardens, VA and ALL 7 parks under the SeaWorld Corporation. “We were very surprised and flattered that our products went over so well in VA.” said Mueller.

SeaWorld Corporation is an international company with theme-based parks located across the United States. US park locations include; Orlando, Florida; San Antonio, Texas; San Diego, California; Chula Vista, California; Tampa, Florida; Williamsburg, Virginia; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Founded in 2012, in Ocean Springs, MS, Marina Cottage Soap Co. has grown their business across the USA. The company offers a wide range of products including all natural soaps, lotions, bubble bath, lip balms and their famous Gneaux more Gnaughty Gnats™ natural repellent. The company specializes in products to help those with Eczema, Psoriasis and other sensitive skin issues.  For more information about Marina Cottage Soap Co., go to:  www.marinacottage.com

 

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Black History Month: NAACP Moss Point – Jackson County and Chevron hosted Honorable Andrew Young, U.N. Ambassador, Civil Rights Leader

Civil-rights-leader-120-1-e1518442032859 Black History Month: NAACP Moss Point - Jackson County and Chevron hosted Honorable Andrew Young, U.N. Ambassador, Civil Rights Leader

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PASCAGOULA – NAACP Moss Point-Jackson County Branch partnered with Chevron Pascagoula Refinery to host a breakfast reception and presentation with the Honorable Andrew Young on February 6. Young is an American politician, diplomat, and activist. An early leader in the civil rights movement, he later became active in politics—serving first as a U.S. Congressman from Georgia, then U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, and, finally, Mayor of Atlanta. 

Over 200 people attended, including about 20 students from Magnolia Middle School in Moss Point. Chevron partnered with the NAACP to bring Young to speak about his experiences and remaining positive in the face of adversity.

Alan Sudduth, Chevron Public and Government Affairs Manager for Mississippi, welcomed the audience  Then Reggie Aaron, Chevron engineer and leader of refinery’s Black Employee Network, introduced Young. for his keynote address.

“I’ve been around a long time and I’ve seen a lot of things,” Young said, “and it upsets me when people say things are no better now than they were back in the 60s.

“Even though things are so much better, they’re still not perfect. So what I try to do is help us understand where we are…. I lived in New Orleans in the middle of a block with an Irish grocery store on one corner, an Italian bar on another, the Nazi Party was on the third corner—and they were hailing Hitler. I was born in 1932, this was about 1936, and I remember it because the way my father explained to me about racism was to take me to the segregated movie to see Jesse Owens in the 1936 Olympics. And he says about the white supremacists who were in the Nazi Party, who were hailing Hitler 50 yards from where I was born, that white supremacy is a sickness. And you don’t let sick people get you upset—you don’t get mad with sick people. He was a dentist, and he said, when people wake me up in the middle of the night with their teeth hurting, I don’t get mad, I try to fix them.

“You don’t ever get mad with people who are sick. And he said ‘don’t get mad, get smart. If you lose your temper in a fight, you lose the fight.

“Things are changing—and one of the things that we learned as children is the world is everchanging, but God is still the same. So order my steps, and I will praise your name! Now, if that’s where we’re coming from, the world has never been as good as it is today.” 

Closing remarks were delivered by Curley Clark, President of the Moss Point-Jackson County NAACP.

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Ocean Springs Artist, USM Alumna Chosen for National Honor

wishik-fw Ocean Springs Artist, USM Alumna Chosen for National Honor

Original post from Southern Miss Now. Courtesy of David Tisdale.

From a young girl doodling on her notepad to shaping steel as an art student at The University of Southern Mississippi, Kelsey Wishik has engaged in creative action as long as she can remember.

That creative action earned Wishik, a multimedia artist from Ocean Springs, Miss. a prominent place in the National Museum of Women in the Arts (NMWA) fifth installment of its exhibition series, titled “Heavy Metal – Women to Watch 2018” after being chosen by a national jury to be the state’s representative for the event.  

According to a news release from the NMWA, “Heavy Metal – Women to Watch 2018,” set for June 28 – Sept. 16, will feature “contemporary artists working in metal to investigate the physical properties and expressive possibilities of metalwork through a wide variety of objects, including sculpture, jewelry, and conceptual forms.” The exhibit also “engages with the fluidity between ‘fine’ art, design, and craft categories, whose traditional definitions are rooted in gender discrimination.”

 

“Women to Watch” is presented every three years in a collaboration between the museum and its national and international outreach committees.

“I feel honored and humbled to be a part of this incredible showing,” said Wishik, who earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Sculpture from USM in 2014. “It has added a lot of heat to a fire of inspiration already burning [in me] to keep creating, learning, and mastering my craft and skills, and reminds me that we are all ambassadors of culture, in a way.”

wishik-fw Ocean Springs Artist, USM Alumna Chosen for National Honor
wishik-fw Ocean Springs Artist, USM Alumna Chosen for National Honor

The exhibition provides Wishik the opportunity to show several of her pieces, alongside a published statement of her work. She will attend the opening reception to connect with other contributors and facilitators, and speak to an international forum the next day about her work and artistic vision. 

“It’s a unique opportunity to share not only my academic studies and technical skills, but my insights, inspirations, passions, and hopes for future projects and potential collaborations,” Wishik said. 

Reflecting on her still young career as an artist, Wishik looks back at her childhood doodling and the stories and songs she wrote that for her gave life a narrative quality, as the genesis for her success.

“Even as a kid, just walking around, I saw so many things speaking through life, through other people, and through nature,” Wishik said. “Some of these fascinations became content for early work, but it was when I discovered abstract art and surrealism around the age of 13 that I became deeply enamored with creating art, and experimenting with what I was capable of through poetry, art, and music.

“Creating art is how I process and revere my experience. Sometimes I apply it for the sake of sheer curiosity, because studying something brings you closer to understanding it. Other times, creation comes with the sense of purging, that I am letting something go, or even inviting something in.”

Wishik loves all the materials she works with in her art for different reasons, but is most enamored with the steel medium. “Something that seems so rigid, hard, and cold can actually yield to being shaped, changed, and warmed quite easily,” she said. “Working with steel is my humble study of this concept on a small scale. I enjoy being able to apply considerable force to something, and shape it with my intention as well. I get that out of the steel fabrication process.”

wishik-fw Ocean Springs Artist, USM Alumna Chosen for National Honor

 

Wishik points to American sculptor and printmaker Lee Bontecou as a role model. “Her work is fantastic and otherworldly,” she said. “It shows great contemplative power and evidence of many years of immersion into her fascinations and self-education of those forms.”

After attending Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College, Wishik transferred to Southern Miss, where she received several scholarships that included the Fred A. Waits Scholarship; the Trustmark Bank Arts Scholarship; the Thelma Johnson Arts Scholarship; and the William Clark Art Scholarship.

Wishik said USM’s “incredible facilities, which offer a breadth of possibilities in many mediums” and proximity to home influenced her decision to choose the university.

“I’m proud of the work I did at USM in steel, because I really took the opportunity to immerse in the studio environment, and take advantage of the resources of both studio and creative community,” she said. “I was able to explore creative work processes in clay, metals, wood, fabric, foam, plaster, and many other materials. It helped me grow my skills quite quickly.”

Jennifer Torres, professor of art at USM and a mentor for Wilshik, said her former student is “exemplary, full of talent and intelligence.”

“What makes her exceptional is the way she attacks life as a whole, and explores the world without regard for boundaries or limitations that others might impose,” Torres said. “She is such a shining light and great example of what we wish for all our students to be, as well as a great ambassador for our program and the University as a whole.”

For Wishik, art isn’t contained on a canvas or in a studio – it’s everywhere. “The world is art. The world is in constant flux — a constant act of transformation and reflection of forces at work,” she said. “The word ‘art’ aside, we are creating at every moment. We can’t help it. We interact with our environment and impress upon it through our thoughts, actions, and speech.

“I think when the art process becomes true magic is when we invite it in intentionally. The process of creating can cultivate concentration, develop our emotions and empathy, and encourage abstract thought.”

Wishik’s advice to current and aspiring artists is to avoid artificial restrictions that suffocate creativity. “Focus your mind and intention where there is vastness, space to roam and imagine – do not waste your mind’s capacity on that which is decided for you without exploration or work, including unexplored limitations, doubts, or self-defeating mindsets,” she said. “These are some key truths I’ve found, and applicable in any setting.”

Learn more about and view Wishik’s work at  www.worksbywish.com. For more information about the National Museum of Women in the Arts, visit https://nmwa.org.
For information about the USM Department of Art and Design, visit https://www.usm.edu/visual-arts. 

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10th Annual Taste of Jackson County THURSDAY, FEB. 8 – Tickets still available! 15 Restaurants Showcased!

 

Screen-Shot-2018-02-07-at-3.57.07-PM 10th Annual Taste of Jackson County THURSDAY, FEB. 8  - Tickets still available! 15 Restaurants Showcased!

The Jackson County Chamber of Commerce is hosting its 10th Anniversary Taste of Jackson County on Thursday, February 8.  Tickets are available to the general public (21 and older) for $45, and tickets will be available at the door. Fifteen restaurants will be featured with a variety of food and beverages.  A live band, the Sicily Swing Trio, will be playing at the event.  The event will be held at Pelican Landing Conference Center in Moss Point. The following restaurants will be featured:

  • Aztecas Restaurant & Cantina
  • Blair’s Diner
  • Brady’s Steaks and Seafood
  • Delo’s Heavenly House of Coffee
  • E.&J. Gallo Winery
  • Family Frozen Foods, Inc.
  • Hacienda San Miguel Mexican Restaurant
  • Hilton Garden Inn Pascagoula
  • Mississippi Sound Seafood
  • Mitchell Distributing
  • Off the Hook Seafood & Cajun Grille
  • Raising Cane’s Chicken Fingers
  • Scranton’s Restaurant & Catering
  • Simply Seafood & Catering LLC
  • Singing River Yacht Club
  • Tay’s BBQ
  • The Shed BBQ & Blues Joint

 This event is a fundraiser for the 2017-2018 Program of Work for the Jackson County Chamber of Commerce.  This is open to members of the Chamber as well as the general public.

“The Taste of Jackson County is our way of showcasing the wonderful food that is available in our county,” said Carla Todd, IOM, President and CEO, of the Jackson County Chamber of Commerce. 

Click this link to buy your ticket(s) online:  https://mxmerchant.com/mxcustomer/d/b6839e9b-3dc6-4efb-ba66-4c1f44ba7718/v3
or contact the Jackson County Chamber of Commerce at 228-762-3391 or order online at www.jcchamber.com. 

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Business of the Week: Crazy B’s Coffee & Confections

Our Business of the Week is Crazy B’s Coffee & Confections in Pascagoula! Lately, they’ve been busy making King Cakes in addition to their other delicious pastries and coffee drinks. You’ll recognize their beautiful King Cakes from our current King Cake giveaway!

Crazy B’s offers a variety of hot, iced and frozen coffee drinks, teas and smoothies. They have fresh baked cookies, muffins and pastries along with specialty candies and other sweets. They are now serving Kolaches in a variety of flavors and chicken salad sandwiches on croissants.

“I love being a part of the growing Jackson County and Pascagoula business community! We enjoy our customers as much as we enjoy making crazy confections!  We are so proud of the support we’ve received and look forward to many years more with the Crazy B’s family!” said Susan Kendrick, Owner/Pastry Chef.

Support your local businesses!  Stop by:

1759 Market St (23.28 mi)
Pascagoula, Mississippi 39567
(228) 696-8775
Hours 6:00 AM – 5:00 PM – Mon-Sat
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ROCK U 2 Dance/Theater Saturday Lab No. 1

Come and take some fun dance/movement-based classes on Saturday February 3 at Rock U 2 with Summer Baldwin and Michelle Bryant for our first monthly Saturday Lab!  These workshops are for kids to study new genres of dance other than their weekly classes; stress relief techniques for auditions and performances; and learn how to take care of and condition the most important instruments for their art: their own bodies, minds and spirits!  

FEB 3 Labs:

  • Yoga & Conditioning for Dance with Summer Baldwin
    10:00-11:00am (Ages 8+) // $15.00
  • Movement & Stress Relief for Actors, Singers, Musicians & Dancers with Summer Baldwin
    11:15-12:15pm (Ages 8+) // $15.00
  • Breakdancing Basics & History with Michelle Bryant 
    12:30-1:45pm (Ages 8+) // $20.00

 

*If a minimum of 4 kids don’t sign up, the class will be canceled the day before. Pre-register: 228-355-2025

 

Copy-of-dancelab1-4-300x232 ROCK U 2 Dance/Theater Saturday Lab No. 1

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Pay It Forward Friday: Shellie Carter Helping Homeless Teens on the Coast

1505924577544 Pay It Forward Friday: Shellie Carter Helping Homeless Teens on the Coast

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Many kids look forward to their 18th birthday, but for kids in foster care their 18th birthday is often the day they become homeless. That is when they “age out” of the foster care system, and unless they have plans to go to college or have someone pick them up and take care of them many of these young adults are left with nowhere to go and end up in the streets. A new program through the Community Care Network, Breakthrough, aims to to rescue these homeless kids that are on the streets and give them the housing and necessities they need to help get them on their feet. 

The Community Care Network is a faith-based, non-profit organization located in Ocean Springs seeking to empower their clients and minister to their physical, emotional, and spiritual need, enabling them to move from addiction, homelessness, and/or incarceration to a stable and independent life. The network is made up of different branches, including a long-term transitional home-Sue’s Home. Sue’s Home helps women and children who have either been displaced by incarceration or rehab and are seeking to get their life’s back on track, so they may unify their family again.

The Breakthrough program began in South Mississippi in July and rescues these 18-to 24-year olds who have aged out of the foster care system and have no job or hopes of going to college, said Shellie Carter, director of the program for the Community Care Network. “Many of these kids have bounced around in foster homes or may come from an abusive home and turn to alcohol and drugs to cope”, she said. 

Carter mentions how she can understand and relate to how uncertain and scared these kids are. “I was a child of an addict”, she said, and at age 6 she and her sister were taken from her mother and placed in a foster care in Harrison County. “I’ve been in your shoes”, she tells the kids. 

The program was founded after receiving the Continuum of Care (COC) Grant through Open Doors Homeless Coalition, which is a coalition for the homeless in Gulfport. “When I met Diane Easley, (Founder and Executive Director of Community Care Network), I thought ‘wow what a blessing it would be to work with the community after experiencing what I have as a child in the foster care system and having addiction touch my life'”, said Carter. 

This is her 9th year working with non-profits and second year with the Community Care Network. At 47, she now believes life has brought her to where she needs to be to put her own past to rest and to take those late-night phone calls from kids in Breakthrough who need help or just someone to listen to their concerns.

Homelessness is a challenge in our area 

The homeless population in Ocean Springs has become a  continuous issue in the city. A 2015 count showed a 300 percent increase in homelessness among ages 18 to 24 in the six southern counties, most of them on the Coast, Carter said. In every other age category the numbers went down, she said. The current count of young people living outside in South Mississippi is 54. “I have people call me daily to try and get into the program and on average about 3 people per week”, said Carter. “We’re funded out through the end of the year and at our max capacity with our budget”, she said. “We don’t have any more room- the problem is that big.” There are currently 11 residents enrolled in the program. 

“There’s a lot of barriers that go into homeless youth. If they’re 18 there’s a lot of apartment complexes who won’t accept an 18 year old signing a lease”, she said. “Another issue is employment and transportation that we’ve come across while trying to help the homeless youth.” 

How it works

The homeless youth first go through a centralized intake through Open Doors Coalition and get all of the information to identify their level of need. “A score of one would be the least amount of need and if they score from five to ten they are really desperate”, she said. 

After determining their need, the next step includes finding an apartment so the young person has a warm, safe place to live. The program provides them with everything from furniture and cooking supplies and even food. “There’s a lot to getting a young person housed who has nothing,” Carter said.

Breakthrough also assigns a case manager who provides help learning how to apply for food stamps, search for jobs and even enrolling them in financial counseling. “It’s very overwhelming to 19-year-olds,” Carter said, since many of them don’t know how to cook or parent and “freeze” when asked to fill out job applications.

The program has had many success stories ike a young woman in Gulfport who was homeless and now has apartment and a high school diploma and plans to start junior college this spring. 

“It can happen to anyone”, says Carter. “So if we can all take our shoes off and walk in someone else’s for a day we can all get that perspective and relate in someway”, she added. “I’m sure at some point in life, addiction has touched someone you know or someone in your family and that’s where our human-ness comes in our ability to touch and reach out to these people and give a hand up, not a hand down”, said Carter. 

How you can help

The program is always in need of supplies for the program such as personal hygiene items, toothbrushes, toothpaste, deodorant. Any leftovers are sent back out into the homeless community. “We make care packages and take them back out into the streets to pass out” said Carter.

For more information on the Breakthrough program or Community Care Network, visit their website at ccms.org.

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Here’s the Final Numbers on November’s Mississippi Coastal Cleanup

OS1 Here's the Final Numbers on November's Mississippi Coastal Cleanup

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The 2017 Mississippi Coastal Cleanup brought in more than 1,700 volunteers to help pick up trash at 40 locations along the coastline. Although the event is typically held in October each year, the cleanup was pushed back to November 18th due to Hurricane Nate.

Volunteers of all ages picked up more than 13 tons of trash along 200 miles of the Mississippi Gulf Coast. Out of all the trash collected, 77% of it was plastic. And the most common item picked up- cigarette butts. Over 48,000 cigarette butts were collected with over 12,000 food wrappers coming in second.

The cleanup is a partnership between the Mississippi State University Extension Service and the Mississippi Debris Task Force. It is a part of the International Coastal Cleanup and is one of the largest volunteer efforts in all of Mississippi. Since 1988, thousands of volunteers gather in the fall to remove millions of pounds of trash from Mississippi’s coastline, waterways, and barrier islands. Additionally, these volunteers help collect data that are used to categorize the major sources of marine debris entering the coastal environment.

Eric Sparks, Assistant Extension Professor at Mississippi State University, says the marine debris problem in our area is pretty bad. “You definitely won’t have a problem going out to our beaches and finding trash”, said Sparks. “We’re working on research trying to figure out how to compare our problem to different areas, but it doesn’t take a hard look to see the issue”, he said. 

However, we can help prevent this problem in a numerous amount of ways. Sparks suggests by first reducing your usage of single-use items such as straws, plastic cups and instead using items like re-usable water bottles. Also, ensuring your items won’t get blown away by the wind can help.

“We’re working on educating young students by going to different schools throughout the year and teaching them to leave the beach the way you found it”, he said. “Our long-term goal is to have these cleanup events and there’s nothing to pick up”, said Sparks. 

Local sponsors have also worked to make the event a success. Chevron, Sparks said, played a huge role in the event by providing a monetary donation for event supplies and by sponsoring its own clean up site. Other sponsors include the U.S. Department of Commerce National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Sea Grant of Mississippi/Alabama, The Shed, Mississippi Department of Marine Resources, Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality and more.

The Mississippi Coastal Cleanup will be hosting a July 5th cleanup to battle all the firework debris that litters our beach and waterways after the night of July 4th festivities. In the long term, Mississippi State University Extension Service aims to sponsor additional smaller cleanups throughout the year. Sparks said this could allow for more people to get involved and will help raise awareness of the impact of trash on the environment. The 30th Annual Mississippi Coastal Cleanup will take place Saturday, October 20th, 2018. More information on the registration of July 5th’s cleanup will be posted at a later time, but interested participants can stay tuned on their site at mscoastalcleanup.org

 

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Audubon’s Master Naturalist Class Now Open for Registration

master-naturalist-class Audubon's Master Naturalist Class Now Open for Registration

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The Pascagoula River Audubon Center is starting 2018 off right with their Audubon Naturalist Volunteer Training program.

The program allows community members to take part in an exciting and insightful class at the Pascagoula River Audubon Center. The Audubon Naturalist Volunteer Training program is designed to expand participants’ understanding of our local environments. The course stays true to the center’s educational mission of connecting people not only to nature, but to our own region’s unique ecology.

Participants in the program are taught about the basic processes that formed and affect the landscape around them, the habitats and organisms that make up and live within the landscape, and the key social and environmental issues affecting the environment. The underlying theme of the Audubon Naturalist program is that habitats exist and function as integrated parts of the overall landscape. As such, the program is habitat-based and focuses attention on the major habitat types in the area where volunteers are trained. The end results are volunteers that are well-versed in local natural history.

The Master Naturalists finish the course ready to teach others about natural history in Mississippi- so they become incredibly helpful and confident volunteers at any number of sites along the Coast. “We can’t run our Center without their time, knowledge, and energy- we utilize their talents for everything from teaching summer camp programs to creating new displays to put on exhibit to planting native plants on our grounds”, said Erin Parker with the Audubon Center. “We offer the course twice a year, once during the winter/early spring and a second in the summer so that teachers can take it for credit during their brief summer vacation!”

“What’s great about the Master Naturalists is that they can help us with all kinds of things, from teaching to native plant landscaping to citizen science projects”, says Parker. “Some of them come weekly, some monthly, some complete projects at home that we incorporate into our exhibits or grounds. And after they’re trained, they might also volunteer at one of the many other sites across the coast- from the Grand Bay NERR to the Mississippi Sandhill Crane Refuge to the Crosby Arboretum”, she said. 

This program is based on the Mississippi Master Naturalist Program, developed by Mark W. LaSalle for the Mississippi State University Extension Service. The program began in coastal Mississippi in 1998 with support from the Chevron Pascagoula Refinery. The Audubon Naturalist program is also supported by Chevron. The program expanded into north Mississippi in 2005 with additional funding provided by a grant from the North Central Mississippi Resource Conservation & Development Council and the Natural Resources Initiative of North Mississippi.

The class costs $250 for non-members of the Center and $225 for members. It includes ten days of teaching, 4 books, and a giant binder of materials, plus all the field trips. “We feel that it’s a great value for people that are interested in really learning about our coastal habitats and ecosystems” said Parker. 

The Naturalist program for winter 2018 will take place on Wednesdays running from January 17th through March 21.Parker mentions how the program is a series, and everything builds on the previous class. While there is a different focus each week, everything is interconnected. Participants get to learn everything from geology to weather to plants to wildlife and get to take field trips to a wide range of ecosystems along the Coast.

To register for the Master Naturalist class, fill out the registration form on their site. Please contact Erin Parker at 228.475.0825 or eparker@audubon.org for more information.

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